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10 Local Stories of the Week

The Jackson City  Council confirmed three new Hinds County municipal judges in late 2017: June Hardwick (pictured), Henry C. Clay III and Ali Shamsiddeen. Photo courtesy June Hardwick

The Jackson City Council confirmed three new Hinds County municipal judges in late 2017: June Hardwick (pictured), Henry C. Clay III and Ali Shamsiddeen. Photo courtesy June Hardwick

There's never a slow news week in Jackson, Miss., and last week was no exception. Here are the local stories JFP reporters brought you in case you missed them:

  1. At Mississippi Economic Council's "Capital Day," Gov. Phil Bryant emphasized the importance of early education and dropout prevention to help get Mississippians ready for the thousands of jobs available in the state.
  2. Three House committees met on Wednesday, Jan. 3, and passed out a package of bills that could divert more funding to the state's roads and bridges.
  3. Hinds County Circuit Court Judge Jeff Weill Sr. sentenced Javondus Beasley to life in prison for capital murder plus two consecutive 40-year sentences for second-degree murder Thursday.
  4. Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves plans to continue to shrink state government in the upcoming legislative session by limiting spending and finding efficiencies.
  5. The Jackson City Council confirmed three new Hinds County municipal judges in late 2017: June Hardwick, Henry C. Clay III and Ali Shamsiddeen.
  6. Some city officials, including retiring Jackson Police Chief Lee Vance, Hinds County District Attorney Robert Shuler Smith and Hinds County Sheriff Victor Mason, have pending litigation against them.
  7. Following Lee Vance's retirement after 30 years with JPD, Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba appointed Anthony Moore as the interim chief of Jackson Police Department Tuesday.
  8. On the last day of 2017, Hinds County Circuit Court Judge Jeff Weill Sr. announced that he will not seek reelection after his term ends on Dec. 31, 2018.
  9. Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann hosted a press conference in his office on Dec. 27 to discuss the results of a business survey finding that Mississippi companies need a more educated workforce.
  10. While Attorney General Jim Hood has not yet opened mental-health task force meetings to public and media scrutiny, members of the group are talking about how they are trying to tackle the state's system of care from practically every angle, including within the criminal-justice system.

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